The Dragon of Yankee Fork: Grave Markers

This is a guest post by Martha Dalke Hindman. It is an excerpt from her upcoming book, The Dragon of Yankee Fork. This is the second of three posts. See also: Devil’s Washbasins.

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Grave Markers preserve for the Ages, records etched in stone.
The Firefighters Circle, Woodlawn Cemetery, St. Maries, Idaho.
57 of the 94 men, who perished fighting the Great Fire of 1910
Rest together in this Sacred Space.

Sentinels towering in the late afternoon Sun,
Old growth Western Red Cedar trees,
Their fragrant, graceful boughs swaying in the breeze
Watch over the square, Red Granite stones.

western redcedar (Thuja plicata)

On a warm and breezy Wednesday afternoon in 2005, peaceful and quiet when Kaye and I visited Woodlawn Cemetery in St. Maries, Idaho. The Firefighters Circle, a tribute to the men who died fighting the Great Fire of 1910. Here, together they rest forever.

“Look carefully at the Grave Markers, Kaye.”

“Do you see the names of each firefighter and the place where he perished; Big Creek, Storm Creek, Defaut Gulch, Swamp Creek and Wallace?”

The men were buried where they had fallen. In 1912, the United States Forest Service hired an undertaking company to exhume the bodies and bring them here to Woodlawn Cemetery, to be identified by family members. The bodies identified by family members are buried in several cities in Idaho and five other states beyond Idaho’s borders. The firefighters with no family members to identify them were first generation immigrant men from Europe. Those are the fifty-seven men buried in a “circle within a circle”, facing each other, creating their own “family” here in Woodlawn Cemetery.

Firefighters’ Circle at Woodlawn Cemetery, St. Maries, Idaho in 2005

My daughter stopped for a moment, tears in her eyes. Her gaze met mine.

“Why the tears, Sweetie?” I asked.

I realized from her expression she was remembering her father’s graveside service in May, 1994. I put my arms around her and held her close. She was missing her Dad, just as much as the families of those firefighters resting together at Woodlawn Cemetery, were missing their loved ones.

The Firefighters Circle at Woodlawn Cemetery, St. Maries, Idaho was rededicated, August 20, 2010, with parades, speeches and an ongoing commitment by the men and women who help protect Idaho’s natural woodlands.

Firefighters’ Circle at Woodlawn Cemetery, St. Maries, Idaho in 2015 (via wikimedia commons)

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Poetry, personal stories, images, journal entries, recipes for Springerle, Cinnamon Rolls, Fried Cakes, “a little bit of science thrown in for good measure,” print and online resources, all define “The Dragon of Yankee Fork,” an Idaho Alphabet from A to Z. It all began on a long piece of cream colored shelf paper! (Visit the Go Fund Me page to learn more about the project and contribute to its creation.)

Martha Dalke Hindman’s outdoor classroom was the travel adventures she shared with her father around the State of Idaho. From dusty roads, fishing expeditions, and a keen sense of observation, learning about Idaho’s heritage gave Ms. Hindman her voice in poetry and personal short stories. She may be reached at martha20022 [at] gmail [dot] com.

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