Influence of a Passion

This is a guest post by Samuel Malley.

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One of the most fascinating parts of plant interest is learning about those who have contributed to it as a whole. It has inspired great men and women who made it what it is today – from the Greek Theophrastrus, regarded as the father of botany through to Margaret Rebecca Dickinson who would bring these plants to life through illustrations. To learn about their lives is an absolute joy, knowing your passion has birthed these amazing people.

Take Carl Linnaeus, for example, a man who invented a method to name plants according to their genus, species, and so forth. We use this commonly today as it has become his legacy that impacts every botanist, gardener, and horticulturist as well as many others in the world. As the Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder would say “fortune favours the brave.” This quote would certainly apply to many. The dream to travel to new far away lands and discover new plant species would indeed inspire those willing to be brave and be rewarded in return. Even now in this day and age people are still imagining and travelling to see what else is out there. And who knows, a plant could be discovered soon that pushes the boundaries of what we think and know.

One of the first botanists I came across just as my obsession was starting was Luca Ghini. Born in 1490, he created the first botanical garden in Pisa, Italy. Ghini also created a technique of drying and pressing plants, eventually being recorded with having the first herbarium. This supposedly contained around three hundred specimens.

To me Luca is one of my personal heroes – someone who’s genius shaped the modern plant world. What a privilege it must have been to be the first to have stepped into the Pisa Garden or to be in the company of Luca as he added a new leaf to his collection. He passed away in 1556, and like every great botanist he left a legacy. Ghini is still here, alive through his garden and his drying technique. To the man himself, if I could go back in time, the two words that I would say to him would be, “Thank you.”

Pisa Botanical Garden - photo credit: Chris / flickr

Pisa Botanical Garden – photo credit: Chris/Flickr

The future ahead in plant interest is a very bright one, awaiting more great people to add to the rich, fascinating history it has to offer full of eye opening men and women.

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Samuel Malley is a horticulture student in the United Kingdom. He is an aspiring botanist and is also interested in creating unique garden sculptures. 

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One thought on “Influence of a Passion

  1. Pingback: 2016: Year in Review – awkward botany

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